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Flowing Force river delta vision 1 Ventjagersplaten (shoals) 2 Bend of St. Andries 3 Rijnstrangen (dead river arms)
Flowing Force river delta vision 1 Ventjagersplaten (shoals) 2 Bend of St. Andries 3 Rijnstrangen (dead river arms)

Ventjagersplaten, from dissected embankments to gradual land-water transitions using three types of design interventions.
Ventjagersplaten, from dissected embankments to gradual land-water transitions using three types of design interventions.

Bend of St. Andries, from a sand-logged main channel to a high-water navigation channel and a low-water channel with river dunes using three types of design interventions.
Bend of St. Andries, from a sand-logged main channel to a high-water navigation channel and a low-water channel with river dunes using three types of design interventions.

Rijnstrangen, van een afgesloten rivierarm met agrarisch peilbeheer naar meestromende strangen met meanderbochten en moeras met behulp van drie typen ontwerpingrepen. / Rijnstrangen, from an arm closed off for agriculture with water-level regulation to flowing currents with meanders and marshland using three types of design interventions.
Rijnstrangen, van een afgesloten rivierarm met agrarisch peilbeheer naar meestromende strangen met meanderbochten en moeras met behulp van drie typen ontwerpingrepen. / Rijnstrangen, from an arm closed off for agriculture with water-level regulation to flowing currents with meanders and marshland using three types of design interventions.

Maps legend
Maps legend

Visualization of Ventjagersplaten
Visualization of Ventjagersplaten

Visualization of Bend of St. Andries
Visualization of Bend of St. Andries

Visualization of Rijnstrangen
Visualization of Rijnstrangen

1 Stick: Start pioneering phase 2 Grid: Supervise following phase 3 Cruiser: ‘Comb’ landscape processes 4 Range: Stimulate gradients 5 Sleeper: Accentuate expanding step 6 High point: Articulate landscape process and use
1 Stick: Start pioneering phase 2 Grid: Supervise following phase 3 Cruiser: ‘Comb’ landscape processes 4 Range: Stimulate gradients 5 Sleeper: Accentuate expanding step 6 High point: Articulate landscape process and use




PROJECTINDEX
HONOURABLE MENTION
FLOWING FORCE
Amsterdam University of the Arts
LANDSCAPE DESIGN

A vision for the river delta as one contiguous nature conservation area.
Flowing Force is a ‘cultural design’ for the Dutch river delta. Its aim is to make stakeholders rethink their approach to this area. The project steps off from the DNA of the Delta when making the landscape design. It shows that landscape-shaping processes can partly do the work for us in creating a richer, more robust and more dynamic landscape.
The Delta plays a major role in our national identity and our economy. We have designed it so that we can live safely, are able to sail our ships through it efficiently and can cycle along it whenever we like. After decades of building, however, we have lost sight of the beautiful nature area at the heart of our country. Functionality prevails, the recreational value fails to fulfil its potential, the natural dynamic is low and the maintenance-prone waterways are facing more and more challenges due to climate change.
Flowing Force therefore proposes that we transform the river delta into a more sustainable and self-sufficient system in which all important functions work together. A system where we make use of the natural forces in order to shape the landscape once again. A landscape that is not only safe and economical but also attractive to visit and with a heightened biodiversity.
Flowing Force uses three locations – hubs where briefs converge – to demonstrate how a vision for dynamic rivers can be rendered in practice. This requires three types of intervention.
By implementing strategic interventions in the system, a variety of briefs can be approached in a positive light. Instead of viewing relevant issues as conflicting, Flowing Force enables them to be mutually reinforcing. A study into landscape design using natural processes led me to a toolbox of 15 ‘land-scapers’ that take the principle of building with nature as their starting point. These tools not only shape the landscape but also deliver added value for biodiversity and recreation. The third aspect to consider alongside strategic interventions and land-scapers was the accessibility of the landscape. These days the area is difficult to reach by car, monotonous for cyclists and illegible for hikers. By making a few hot spots easily accessible, people from outside the area can get to know the river landscape more easily without disturbing its tranquillity.
I am convinced that by designing designated places from this alternative perspective, a totally different idea of the Dutch river delta can ultimately arise; one comparable to the grandeur of national parks like Grand Canyon. What is more, the Dutch Delta can excel in its own flowing force and place on the map a rich and dynamic landscape that new generations can enjoy and which will also protect us against floods. A landscape that sees fundamental change, because our own mindset changes.