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A hyper-specialized hospital with a European target group
A hyper-specialized hospital with a European target group

Site plan in the Schiphol Corridor
Site plan in the Schiphol Corridor

Automated bioprinting facility
Automated bioprinting facility

Courtyard
Courtyard


Two stacked worlds: the hard hospital function and the soft patient domain
Two stacked worlds: the hard hospital function and the soft patient domain

Ingang vanaf de waterweg van Schiphol
Ingang vanaf de waterweg van Schiphol





PROJECTINDEX
 
THE ORGAN FACTORY
Technische Universiteit Delft
ARCHITECTURE

A transplantation hospital for the airport city
It is the year 2050. The Organ Factory has been projected in the core of the Schiphol Corridor. It is a hyper-specialized hospital which performs transplantation surgeries and distributes freshly biomanufactured organs, combined with a medical resort. Airports are forever expanding and urbanizing. Cities in turn are becoming increasingly shaped by world citizens who stay there for the shortest time. As the sense of distance diminishes, the natural limitations of the human body become increasingly burdoned by our hectic way of life.
The design proposal is the result of an investigation into the future urban development of Amsterdam, focusing on the area between the city border and Schiphol Airport. The growing tendency among airports to urbanize and expand beyond purely aviation-related services has given birth to a new phenomenon, the airport city. This absorbs typologies originally native to densely populated urban environments, adapting them to the functional framework of the airport. These airport cities, however, are far from urban, being profit-driven and consisting of campuses and channels instead of blocks and streets. By constructing a speculative narrative for a future passenger-driven typology, the project seeks to investigate the potential of airport amenities as mediators between global demands and local urbanity.
The Organ Factory is based on the dense courtyard model of the first city hospitals with the hallway as the organizing element. This model has been modified using the organizational and programmatic characteristics of the campus and the flow efficiency of airport infrastructure. The result is a megastructure, a truly generic entity with its own internal system enabling maximum interaction between the building and its context of roads, public transport and polder landscape. Two worlds, one of efficiency and one of healing, are woven into the building. Hospital duties are housed in the extruded supporting structure whose intervening spaces are column-free open storeys which patients and visitors occupy on their own terms. The project is the typological and architectural outcome of the transformative forces that global developments exert on our cities. It investigates the hospital as a fundamentally urban type and applies it to the questionable urban condition of airport cities.