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The gallery acts as a filter for the park. When walking in the park, you can pass between the slab-shaped pillars of the gallery into the central courtyard. Alternatively you can follow the rhythm of the gallery which routes you past the four smaller yards of the respective pavilions.
The gallery acts as a filter for the park. When walking in the park, you can pass between the slab-shaped pillars of the gallery into the central courtyard. Alternatively you can follow the rhythm of the gallery which routes you past the four smaller yards of the respective pavilions.

Simple and seemingly trivial day-to-day occurrences are important, especially if you have lost your equilibrium. Bachelard stresses the qualities of domestic space through his poetry. When we consider the day’s rituals, we find comfort and stability in their structure and we enjoy one another’s support. These quotidian rituals can endow architecture with spatial substance. Sometimes we lose sight of the quality of ordinary things.
Simple and seemingly trivial day-to-day occurrences are important, especially if you have lost your equilibrium. Bachelard stresses the qualities of domestic space through his poetry. When we consider the day’s rituals, we find comfort and stability in their structure and we enjoy one another’s support. These quotidian rituals can endow architecture with spatial substance. Sometimes we lose sight of the quality of ordinary things.

The design is intended to give a feeling that the core of the building belongs to the resident patients, and that visitors are just that, visitors. A pavilion typology stresses the individuality of the members of a group, whereas a square suggests a larger community. Both typologies are present in the design. There are four pavilions, or houses, each with its own small courtyard. The pavilions are connected by a gallery which surrounds a larger central courtyard. The interplay of the varying gradients of spaces creates more alternatives for being somewhere and for going somewhere.
The design is intended to give a feeling that the core of the building belongs to the resident patients, and that visitors are just that, visitors. A pavilion typology stresses the individuality of the members of a group, whereas a square suggests a larger community. Both typologies are present in the design. There are four pavilions, or houses, each with its own small courtyard. The pavilions are connected by a gallery which surrounds a larger central courtyard. The interplay of the varying gradients of spaces creates more alternatives for being somewhere and for going somewhere.

The clinic is sited at a quiet location in the Looiakkers district of south Eindhoven, facing the city park and near the Parktheater. Its other side faces the rear of houses.
The clinic is sited at a quiet location in the Looiakkers district of south Eindhoven, facing the city park and near the Parktheater. Its other side faces the rear of houses.

The design is intended to give a feeling that the core of the building belongs to the resident patients, and that visitors are just that, visitors. A pavilion typology stresses the individuality of the members of a group, whereas a square suggests a larger community. Both typologies are present in the design. There are four pavilions, or houses, each with its own small courtyard. The pavilions are connected by a gallery which surrounds a larger central courtyard. The interplay of the varying gradients of spaces creates more alternatives for being somewhere and for going somewhere.
The design is intended to give a feeling that the core of the building belongs to the resident patients, and that visitors are just that, visitors. A pavilion typology stresses the individuality of the members of a group, whereas a square suggests a larger community. Both typologies are present in the design. There are four pavilions, or houses, each with its own small courtyard. The pavilions are connected by a gallery which surrounds a larger central courtyard. The interplay of the varying gradients of spaces creates more alternatives for being somewhere and for going somewhere.




PROJECTINDEX
 
TOUT EST POÉSIE
Technische Universiteit Eindhoven
ARCHITECTURE

A quest for intimate space in architecture
This project encompasses the design of a psychiatric clinic near Eindhoven’s Stadswandelpark, the city walking park. People with psychiatric problems benefit strongly from domestic stability. The design makes it possible for resident patients to wander from room to room in the clinic. The spatial sequence has an atmosphere of its own; each space has a distinct character. My hope is that this design will give psychiatric patients space. The project concerns itself with the small things of life and the quality of (mental) health, so that people can find quietness.
My view is that, quite apart from the use of medicines, nursing care and therapies, there is something we all need whether we are sick or healthy: a sense of being – of being an individual and of being treated as one. I seek to create intimate space in architecture, space where we can feel safe and sheltered, as in a house. But the question is what is a house, and what makes a house a home. How can we give people with psychiatric problems a “home”, a place where they can be both together and alone, a place to be yourself? Furthermore, how do we behave, how can we influence our behaviour through interior spaces and, as a designer, how can I become more sensitive to behaviour? By being more open-minded and daring to look at things differently, you enable yourself and others to see things as a designer, as a person. Reading poetry helps here. A poem awakens your imagination, and seduces you to wander through different spaces. It breathes new life into memories. When we read, we return to what we once knew or felt in a similar situation. These associations can consist of visual images, aromas and flavours, or they can be a collage of experiences that leads to new images, to daydreams. My belief is that architecture can achieve the same effect as poetry. Architecture is everything we live in, including the space in which time shapes us.
My quest began with Poetics of Space (1958), a book by the French scientist, philosopher, poet and phenomenologist Gaston Bachelard. Its subject is the disclosure of the meanings of domestic space; the panorama of the poetic imagination. Through poetry, Bachelard gives us an understanding of the classic perspective from which we experience intimate space. The poetic images of the house show us what “inhabiting” means and can mean. Understanding the images of intimacy of the house is important for the design. The basis is that a domestic atmosphere has to be created, even if the occupant stays there for no more than a short period. The house is a house of things, with its rooms, cupboards, drawers and chests, which represent that which is hidden. Architecture does not stop at the shell; its true seduction begins inside. When we speak of behaviour, that is where it begins: in our direct interaction with space. Here we touch on “behaviour in form” - the moment when architecture invites you to take part in the scene and when you gratefully immerse yourself in your role. Assuming there is such a thing as a universal language of space, as Bachelard suggests, how can I try to understand it and interpret it as architecture?
The work of Bachelard, the poetry of Sylvia Plath, my own experiences and thoughts, small architectural and poetic models: I have taken bits and pieces from all these things and tried to compose them into essentials for the design. I can not identify exactly where each of these bits and pieces came from, but they have meaning to me; the intimate, the garden, distances, silence and rhythm; light and vision and things.
In my view an architect must be sensitive to things that emerge from the design process; so as to understand what life is, and to give something more to people who live with and in the architecture; something to wander in and pause at.