Nederlands English

The head of the peninsula seen from the air. Right, the docks and left, Westland horticultural region. The water north of the peninsula is the ‘New Waterway’.
The head of the peninsula seen from the air. Right, the docks and left, Westland horticultural region. The water north of the peninsula is the ‘New Waterway’.

The design is comprised of seven interventions in the landscape and covers the entire Rozenburg peninsula. 1 auditorium or open-air theatre 2 café with waterside terrace 3 open-air expo on the docks 4 picnic spot 5 old island path 6 bird listening hide 7 viewing tower
The design is comprised of seven interventions in the landscape and covers the entire Rozenburg peninsula. 1 auditorium or open-air theatre 2 café with waterside terrace 3 open-air expo on the docks 4 picnic spot 5 old island path 6 bird listening hide 7 viewing tower

The seven interventions
The seven interventions

Model of observation tower
Model of observation tower

The bird listening hide isolates visitors from the bustle and noise of the docks and creates a new stage for the sand martins.
The bird listening hide isolates visitors from the bustle and noise of the docks and creates a new stage for the sand martins.

Projected halfway along the peninsula are a number of screened-off places for cyclists and car drivers looking for a sheltered picnic spot or somewhere to enjoy the view away from the wind.
Projected halfway along the peninsula are a number of screened-off places for cyclists and car drivers looking for a sheltered picnic spot or somewhere to enjoy the view away from the wind.

A roofed outdoor area can accommodate a snack cart or mobile lunchroom with a waterside terrace.
A roofed outdoor area can accommodate a snack cart or mobile lunchroom with a waterside terrace.

The current method of tipping waste on the peninsula (above) and the proposed new method of sustainable waste storage (below), shown in a cutaway drawing of the peninsula.
The current method of tipping waste on the peninsula (above) and the proposed new method of sustainable waste storage (below), shown in a cutaway drawing of the peninsula.




PROJECTINDEX
 
THE PENINSULA REDISCOVERED
Amsterdam University of the Arts
ARCHITECTURE

A narrative landscape in the Port of Rotterdam
The project presents seven interventions in the landscape of the Rozenburg peninsula that are to activate the qualities of this exceptional leftover site deep inside the Rotterdam docks. The aim is to entice visitors to explore this remarkable area.
Rozenburg is a village built in the 1960s to house dock workers. The docks as they are today are the result of the act of shovelling, filling, dredging, raising, strengthening and endlessly digging off and piling on sand in the estuary of the River Maas. Amidst the docks is an expanse of leftover land, the Rozenburg peninsula. Once part of De Beer nature reserve, its history is hitched to the expansion of the Rotterdam docks. Since it took on its present form, the peninsula has been used for ground storage and waste deposit at different points along its length. The thing about the peninsula that puts visitors off is the fact that many parts of it are inaccessible, visually amorphous and unexciting. The upshot is that many visitors drive straight to the tip of the peninsula and then drive straight back again.
The design consists of seven interventions in the landscape and takes up the entire peninsula of Rozenburg. Each intervention showcases a specific quality of the site in its own way. These interventions make the site more accessible, more transparent and more exciting and entice visitors to experience more of the peninsula and its surroundings. The interventions derive from the morphology of the location and the tectonics of the harbour landscape. Shaped by machines, this landscape has solidified completely into its present fixed shape. My aim in introducing an innovative method of landfill is to help new programme components on the peninsula to take shape and grow into the landscape. In this way the landscape can become the built fabric and the built fabric the landscape.
The seven interventions are made using hazardous waste, mostly the remains from burning household waste, that has been stabilized with cement. The waste is encapsulated at grain scale and thus can be easily stored after treatment with no significant aftercare. The spaces for use on site are shaped by making walls, floors and ceilings of concrete based on fly ash cement. The buildings grow in time as new waste is deposited, so that the newly added programme components can be expanded ever further. This new geopolymer concrete has an aluminium silicate basis, just like the cement used in the concrete of Ancient Rome.
Ordinarily, landfills have all the features of a black box and require permanent management. Nowadays sustainable waste storage is another possibility. With new methods of landfill, an infinitely safe situation can arise within a single generation. This, briefly, is the outcome of five years’ extensive research by others into sustainable landfill.
My project is best illustrated by the 18 metre long installation of the peninsula (scale 1:500) mounted with plaster models of the seven interventions and with corresponding images in the background. The installation shows this project in its full glory. The peninsula at scale 1:500 is made from a sheepskin rug with all the necessary information - roads, topography, vegetation, embankments - embroidered by hand. To mark each intervention a steel pin protrudes from the rug bearing aloft an enlarged plaster model of the concrete intervention planned at that place. The waste to be deposited is left out of the models so as to show and explain the moulds as excavated structures in their purest form.