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Model photograph of workshop interior
Model photograph of workshop interior

Model photograph illustrating 24 hours of daylight
Model photograph illustrating 24 hours of daylight

Model photograph of overview
Model photograph of overview

Progressie in beton, verhoudingen volgens Fibonacci reeks
Progressie in beton, verhoudingen volgens Fibonacci reeks

Progression in wood 2, proportions and numbers in accordance with the Fibonacci sequence
Progression in wood 2, proportions and numbers in accordance with the Fibonacci sequence

Elevational drawing and section through the workshop and towards the saw area
Elevational drawing and section through the workshop and towards the saw area






PROJECTINDEX
HONOURABLE MENTION
THE WORKSHOP
Academie van Bouwkunst Maastricht
ARCHITECTURE

Manifesto of the tectonic on Via Jecore
The designed building houses a small-scale timber workshop where locally harvested trees are processed for local use. The workshop is designed as a tectonic manifestation of the natural resources found in the valley of the Jeker River and its principles of geological stratification. Concrete made from local limestone and timber from the area form the basic materials for this project. These materials refer to the landscape in the way they are applied in the construction. Nature has its own principles of self-assembly as described by Fibonacci. I used these principles to investigate the possibilities of transforming those natural resources into a building. Proceeding from the Golden Section of a block of one litre I developed several transformations that allowed me to construct a number of basic rules and a simple language that together illustrate the immanent qualities of the materials. Concrete, able to withstand pressure, is used for the walls carrying the roof. The level of pressure is made visible by the density of the successive layers of concrete. Wood, able to withstand bending, is used for the roof structure, which unfurls like a tree canopy over the concrete walls.
The building is sited in the Jeker valley straddling the Belgian-Dutch border along the recently restored Via Jecore, an old agricultural route connecting the villages in the valley. After half a century of regional and global orientation, this route for me has the potential to stimulate locally oriented life and explore its quality in the days of late capitalism. The site of the workshop relates to the slow process of naturally processing wood by growing, watering, sawing and drying. The visibility of this process makes it easier to assess the value of the result and the craftsmanship attendant on it can be seen as a means of living where the immanent quality of the work itself rises above the secondary value of making a profit.
This immanent quality, a theme that arose through my intuitive interest in the materiality of the landscape, became a guiding principle throughout the project as a whole. Initially for the material and the tectonic, but also for embedding the building in the landscape and ultimately for the immanent quality of the input of those using the building.