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Collage illustrating the follies’ relationship with the brickworks and their integration into the nature of Meinerswijk.
Collage illustrating the follies’ relationship with the brickworks and their integration into the nature of Meinerswijk.

Site plan The landscape of Meinerswijk as transformed by the Elden brickworks, showing the sightlines between the architectural follies and the former brickworks.
Site plan The landscape of Meinerswijk as transformed by the Elden brickworks, showing the sightlines between the architectural follies and the former brickworks.

Longitudinal section of the hotel: on the ground floor the hotel rooms and on the first floor the restaurant with the terrace on the left. Cross section of the hotel: on the ground floor the hotel rooms and on the first floor the public restaurant on the left and the rooms reserved for hotel guests on the right.
Longitudinal section of the hotel: on the ground floor the hotel rooms and on the first floor the restaurant with the terrace on the left. Cross section of the hotel: on the ground floor the hotel rooms and on the first floor the public restaurant on the left and the rooms reserved for hotel guests on the right.

The former smoke corridor now accesses the hotel rooms, with a central opening in its roof to allow in daylight.
The former smoke corridor now accesses the hotel rooms, with a central opening in its roof to allow in daylight.

The structure of the bathroom is kept light, the flame openings in the brick wall have been transformed into new lighting fixtures.
The structure of the bathroom is kept light, the flame openings in the brick wall have been transformed into new lighting fixtures.

The wooden construction is pointed up by the large open space of the restaurant where tables for the hotel guests are dispersed between the kitchens.
The wooden construction is pointed up by the large open space of the restaurant where tables for the hotel guests are dispersed between the kitchens.

The concept forming the architectural follies is the deconstruction of the brickyard typology into its constituent elements of chimney, roof, wooden construction, tunnel ovens, fire and clay pit. The follies are abstracted by the geometric simplification and deconstruction of the typological elements of the brick oven.
The concept forming the architectural follies is the deconstruction of the brickyard typology into its constituent elements of chimney, roof, wooden construction, tunnel ovens, fire and clay pit. The follies are abstracted by the geometric simplification and deconstruction of the typological elements of the brick oven.

Section over Meinerswijk landscape: the Nederrijn, the brickyard, the architectural follies, the natural floodplain.
Section over Meinerswijk landscape: the Nederrijn, the brickyard, the architectural follies, the natural floodplain.




PROJECTINDEX
 
BRICKWORKS: A DECONSTRUCTION
Technische Universiteit Eindhoven
ARCHITECTURE,LANDSCAPE DESIGN

The redevelopment of the Elden brickworks and the Meinerswijk landscape
The redevelopment project involves the renovation and transformation of brickyard Elden into a hotel and restaurant while maintaining the typical characteristics of the brick industry. The spaces, the mass, the chimney and the tunnel ovens provide inspiration for the new design. The changes to the building can be seen as a new historical layer. No elements are added, but rather removed as a beginning of deconstruction in time. The project of redevelopment also extends to the surrounding natural landscape of Meinerswijk where architectural follies referring back to the brickyard are placed.
During the 20th century, the landscape and skyline along the Nederrijn River in Arnhem was drastically transformed as a result of intensive clay extraction by the brick industry. The Elden brickworks began operations in 1928, producing clinker bricks in a new flame oven. With the mechanization and reorganization of this industry sector, these brickworks closed down in 1992. This redevelopment project seeks to renovate the Elden brickworks and transform them into a hotel and restaurant, retaining characteristic aspects of that industry. The spaces, the mass, the chimney and the tunnel ovens were a source of inspiration for the new design. The modifications to the building can be regarded as a new layer of history. Elements are not added, however, but removed as the first step in a deconstruction in time.
Meinerswijk in Arnhem is a richly varied flood plain of great natural and cultural-historical value. This recreational nature park has a landscape of historical layers, with its remains of a Roman fort, the IJssel defence line and the brick industry. That industry transformed the area through its extraction of clay, leaving clay pits, which is why Meinerswijk is now part of the Dutch industrial heritage.
The layers of history in the landscape and the steadily disappearing brick industry were sources of inspiration for designing new objects scattered in the natural landscape of Meinerswijk. These architectural sculptures recall the brick industry and invite visitors to explore the nature park and spend time there. The visual links provided by the objects lead visitors through the nature area and make them aware of the transformed landscape. These elements become one with nature and also reach out to the other objects present in the landscape such as the concrete bunkers and the foundations of the Roman fort. These archetypical follies are related to the typical elements of the deconstructed Elden brickworks: the chimney, the roof, the wooden construction, the oven, the fire and the clay pits. By applying geometric simplification and deconstruction to these elements, the follies relinquish their special bond with the Elden brickworks to become an abstract archetype of the brick industry in the minds of visitors.
The deconstruction process stresses the similarities between brickworks everywhere, revealing the essence of this sector of industry. Through the intensity of visitor experience of the follies and the imaginary reconstruction of the brickwork archetypes, these follies trigger the transition from phenomenal reality to the noumenal wealth of ideas that constitute the history of Arnhem’s brick industry.