Nederlands English

Site plan
Site plan

Model
Model

Front elevation
Front elevation

Rear elevation
Rear elevation

Insertion into urban context
Insertion into urban context

Renderings
Renderings






PROJECTINDEX
 
TOUR DE CURIOSITÉ
Academie van Bouwkunst Maastricht
ARCHITECTURE

Tour de Curiosité is a house for a female collector and is about cherishing and preserving her personal collection. This is a project where depot and expo meet, one that seeks to connect the visible and the invisible.
It is neither a museum nor a private house but a new typology combining the characteristics of both. The project is the designer’s personal translation of her own interests that come together in an ode to the collector. It is an autobiographical quest for identity and a fascination for the ephemeral and for collecting, subjects that serve as the basis for this project. A theoretical study into the reception history clarifies the relationship between collecting and the ephemeral by means of two key sub-themes, the 16th-century Wunderkammer, or cabinet of curiosities, and escapism. The project steps off from these two concepts. The theme of the Wunderkammer can be connected to the private house and can also be regarded as a precursor of the museum. This project explores the roles of the Wunderkammer and escapism and how these concepts manifest themselves in contemporary architectural discourse. It seeks to generate a paradoxical link between exhibition and archive, the conventional and the unconventional. From this emerges a compelling relationship between object, person and space. Tour de Curiosité is sited in Liège, a city that can be regarded as a collection in itself. Its fragmentary and dynamic nature is further enhanced by the grey film that industry has left on the city. It is a place that reflects the beauty of imperfection. The meaning and relevance of the ephemeral in an urban context is clearly observable and weds well with the complexity of the brief. The project goes on to shed light on the role architecture can fulfil at a time when the visual and the visible play a major part in our daily lives. It also examines how the theme of ephemerality can contribute to this. The brief explores along broad lines how the ephemeral and the urge to collect can relate to the architectural discourse. This was the goal, not just in the completed design but throughout the process. Designing is collecting and architecture is ephemeral. It would be an illusion to think otherwise.